3 Lesson Plans on The Day the Crayons Quit – Years 1/2/3

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Lesson Plan 1 – Making Connections – The Day the Crayons Quit

Summary of Lesson Plans / Rationale:

These lessons are designed for lower years (level 2) based upon connecting the events in the story book – ‘The Day the Crayons Quit’. The initial lesson is a reading one with a focus on questioning and making connections, while the second and third lessons focus on an independent letter writing activity that is accompanied by a piece of artwork. There is a strong emphasis on informative and imaginative text – sentence structure, use of sight words, phonological awareness, grammar, connecting words, sentence formation.

Australian Curriculum Links:

  • (ACELA1463) – Understanding that different types of texts have identifiable text structures and language features that hell the text serve its purpose. Elaboration: Identify the topic and type of text through its visual presentation- cover page, title, sub title, images. (ACARA, 2017).
  • This lesson will enable students to understand that simple connecting clauses made between ideas by using compound sentences with two or more clauses usually include a coordinating conjunction (ACELA1467) (ACARA, 2017).
  • Students will be using comprehension strategies to build literal and inferred meaning and analyse text by drawing on growing knowledge, context, language and visual features and print (ACELY1670).
  • Students will be able to compare opinions about characters, events and settings in and between texts (ACELT1589).
  • Students will demonstrate by discussing how the characters and settings of different texts explore how language is used to present these features in different ways (ACELT1591).

 

Learning Objectives:

The students will be able to:

  • Listen to, read, view, create and interpret spoken, written texts to entertain – inform and persuade using picture books as a model to constructing their own work.
  • Demonstrate and become independent readers focus on sequence of events and present unusual happenings.
  • Focus, create, explain and understand the different language and sentence structures based upon sight words – decoding words phonically, punctuation convention, illustrations and diagrams that support and extends printed texts.
  • Learning how to express ideas by using compound sentences – verbally, written and with images.
  • Predict, summarise and review meaning.
  • Make connections between information, print and images.
  • Make connections between the text and students own experiences.
  • Build upon prior knowledge and vocabulary.
  • Discuss each other’s preferences for stories set in familiar / unfamiliar worlds or about people whose lives are like / unlike their own.
  • Describe plots – including beginnings – orientation – how the problem – complication – is introduced and solved – resolution and considered how these features construct meaning.

 

Prior Knowledge:

The teacher has briefly shown the students the books in the conclusion of the last lesson and the students ideas relating to the books cover were discussed – briefly.

Learning Environment:

The students are sitting in the literacy – learning area of the classroom facing the teacher, whiteboard, teacher chair, big book. – The Day The Crayons Quit and colourful plastic hand pointer. The students prior completed English – Literacy work is displayed around the English – literacy learning area – on the walls.

Resources:

  • The story book – big book and students class set – the day the crayons quit.
  • Whiteboard – markers and eraser.
  • Student set of iPads / & laptops
  • Teacher laptop.
  • 5 w ‘s and 1 H large cut out cards
  • Visual and written cards – focusing in the story themes, characters etc.
  • Large cut outs of the different coloured crayons
  • Bubble texts of the coloured crayons comments and solutions

 

Contingency plan:

The students can sit on large cushions during the time the teacher reads the story out aloud to create a relaxing learning environment.

The teacher can use an activity instead of a table where the teacher has created cut outs of the themes, main characters, comments in the storybook – written and visual and the students need to match the written with the visual images and the five W’s and 1 H questions.

Lesson Plan Sequence:

Introduction and Motivation:

  1. The teacher begins by explaining to the students that they will ne completing four continuous lessons based upon the story book – The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt.
  2. The teacher introduces the storybook by firstly pointing to the cover of the big book – which the teacher has placed on the whiteboard ledge and uses a hand pointer to direct the students to what the teacher is asking or referring to in connection to the storybook – to ensure the students have a clear view of the storybook.
  3. The teacher asks the students: “What do you think the story is about?” – “Why?”
    1. “What does the title of the story tell us?
    2. “What is the picture on the cover page tell us?
  4. As the teacher reads the storybook out aloud they stop / pause between pages and ask the students questions to endure they are focusing on the story contents – characters, themes.
    1. “How many coloured crayons are in the crayon packet?” -reference to first page.
    2. “What does Duncan find in the crayon packet?”
    3. “Which coloured crayon has just communicated to Daryl – what did they say and how did they explain their comment to Duncan?
  5. The students are using their listening bodies (bottoms on the floor, hands not fidgeting with anything, hands on knees – unless answering a question where hands will be raised up high until the teacher asks a question and the students wish to answer the question) when the teacher is reading the story book out aloud and asking promoting and guided / inquiry / open ended questions.

Body of the lesson:

  1. The students sit on the floor in the English / Literacy learning area facing the teacher, whiteboard, teacher chair, the big book – The Day the Crayons Quit – which is placed on the ledge of the Whiteboard and large cut outs of the five – w’s – where, what, who, when and why? And 1 H – How (in different bright bold coloured art cardboard – and typed up using large Victorian Cursive font- Writing font to suit the teaching state).
  2. The Teacher begins to ask the students questions about the story – The Day the Crayons Quit.
  3. The teacher has pre drawn up a table with the subheadings – Main characters, Theme / s
  4. The teacher asks the students questions that connect to the pre drawn table and enable the teacher to test the students’ knowledge – prior, current and new – after listening to the story.
  5. The teacher fills in the table with the students answers and reasons and also places a visual image next to the written context.
  6. The students then write a summary of the storybook – The Day the Crayons Quit – in their English writing book – ensuring they use the knowledge in the table and include reasons for their answers. The students need to focus on their sentence structure, word spacing, use of conjunction words and grammar.
  7. The students need to place the book title, date and include a margin prior to starting their writing activity.

Early Finishers:

  • The students are able to complete a sequence activity where the students need to draw the main themes of the storybook in the correct order – with titles.
  • The students can complete general online story writing activities that assist them with identifying the story theme/s, characters
  • The students can communicate with the person sitting next to them on their table in a low voice – their ideas relating to the story – The Day the crayons quit – focusing on the 5 w’s and 1 H while using their small – normal sized student set of the story book to refer too – creating brainstorming and mind mapping documents which highlight their ideas.

 

Conclusion:

  1. The tidy up monitors go around the room to ensure all resources are placed neatly in their location.
  2. The teacher chooses five students to complete a shared activity to the whole class – the students sitting on the floor can ask a maximum of two questions to each of the five students sharing their activity.
  3. The teacher checks each student completed work – asking them questions to test their completed work with their level of understanding; story theme/s, characters, events, imagination – use of creativity…dates, stamps and writes a small comment in their workbooks – teacher uses praising words of motivation to the students.
  4. Teacher recaps – summarises the story.
  5. The teacher also gets the students thinking about the follow up lesson by stating questions about why do the students think the crayons wanted to quit? Did they do it in the right way? If you were Duncan or one of the crayons what would your day or do?
  6. The teacher places the different coloured crayons – large cut puts on the whiteboard all in different order and places different bubbles with what each coloured crayon states to Duncan. Then the students need to match up what each coloured crayon states to Duncan – in the correct order – reference to the book is ok but just three times as prior to the activity starting the students are 5 minutes to silently read through the story book – student copies – smaller version books of The day the crayons quit and use mental learning memory strategies to focus on what each coloured crayon stated to Duncan. Then the students are given five minutes to create Duncan’s replies to the crayons using a few words or one sentence – this will assist with the next lesson.

Assessment and Evaluation of the Lesson:

  • Anecdotal notes
  • Testing students level of knowledge and understanding about the story book against their completed work and learning objectives
  • Observation
  • Questioning – open ended, inquiry based
  • Extended imagination questions, creativity and inclusive learning strategies.
  • Progression charts and notes.
  • Evaluation notes.

 

Follow up lesson:

Letter Writing – The Day The Crayons Quit

 

Lesson Plan 2 – Letter Writing – The Day The Crayons Quit

Learning Objectives:

The students will be able to:

  • Listen to, read, view, create and interpret spoken, written texts to entertain – inform and persuade using picture books as a model to constructing their own work.
  • Demonstrate and become independent readers focus on sequence of events and present unusual happenings.
  • Focus, create, explain and understand the different language and sentence structures based upon sight words – decoding words phonically, punctuation convention, illustrations and diagrams that support and extends printed texts.
  • Learning how to express ideas by using compound sentences.
  • Predict, summarise and review meaning.
  • Make connections between information, print and images.
  • Make connections between the text and students own experiences.
  • Build upon prior knowledge and vocabulary.
  • Learn how to join simple sentences with conjunctions – but, they, and, so
  • Create a range if imaginative, informative and persuasive texts – imaginative retelling (ACARA, 2017).

 

Prior Knowledge:

The students:

  • Created mail box – red postage box during an Art lesson – as a whole class activity made out of cardboard.
  • Went for an excursion to a local post office – aimed at letter writing, communicated with post man, a supervisor, writing lesson of completing a correct letter layout with the envelope.
  • Completed a reflective, recount and procedural writing lessons relating to the excursion to the post office and letter writing – general.

 

Learning Environment:

  • The students sit in the literacy / English writing area where the teacher introduces the lesson – letter writing. The students are facing the whiteboard, teacher chair, teacher’s plastic tub which includes some resources to be used in this lesson, teacher laptop / Smartboard, lessons learning intentions, date and the words – The day the crayons quit and letter writing are written in large cursive font on the whiteboard with images and key words relating to the story and letter writing.
  • The students are using their listening bodies – while sitting on the floor – bottoms on the floor, hands not fidgeting with anything, hands on knees if not hands are up in the air answering or asking a question and eyes and ears facing and listening to the teacher and other students’ answers, questions or comments.
  • Students prior completed Literacy / English work are displayed around this specific learning area
  • The big book version of The Day the Crayons Quit is placed on the whiteboard ledge.
  • Students set of small books – of the storybook The Day the Crayons Quit ate placed in the tub of resources near the teacher’s chair.
  • If students need to sit on the floor to complete any activities, they can use the large cushions which are placed at the back of the room – literacy / English learning area.
  • If students use their laptops or iPads the must be in clear view if the teacher at all times – screens – the students can sit at the ICT learning area which is at the back of the classroom in the middle back wall with the screens facing inwards or in the centre of the specific learning area (literacy / English room) where the teacher has clear view of all screens.
  • There are Letter writing posters and sentence formation, grammar, joining words and general posters placed above of the whiteboard which the teacher refers to and points to using the hand pointer and can be referred to and clearly seen and applied by the students, at all times.

 

Resources:

  • The story book big book and class set – The day the crayons quit.
  • Student writing books – English
  • Red post office box – created in Art class by students.
  • Envelopes
  • Teachers hand pointer
  • Butcher paper
  • Large Art cardboard paper
  • Visuals and written words – The day the crayons quit.
  • Large sitting cushions
  • Whiteboard – markers and erasers
  • Pencils, pens, erasers, rulers
  • Laptops and iPads – class sets and teachers
  • Sticky tape
  • Blue tac
  • Teacher date stamp
  • Teachers student evaluation note books

 

Contingency plan:

The teacher can ask the students to check through each other’s completed letters once finished – checking for sentence formation, grammar correction, ideas, involve students in asking questions about the content – this can be part if the lesson – during brainstorming, mind mapping, drafting stage.

Lesson Plan Sequence:

Introduction and Motivation:

The teacher:

  1. Introduces the lesson by summarising, re capping and asking open ended inquiry open ended questions about the prior lesson on the story book The day the crayons Quit.
  2. Refers to the big book – The Day the Crayons Quit which is placed on the whiteboard ledge and using the hand pointer as a reference guide and to ensure the books images and contents are all in clear view of all the students.
  3. The teacher draws a large hamburger in the whiteboard as a metaphor representing how to write a letter – what goes on top, middle and at the end.
  4. The teacher explains that just like a hamburger you need to include every layer – you cannot serve it without the nun on too, the filling in the middle or the bun on the bottom. That is just like writing a letter – you need to structure – write it a set way – set structure.
  5. The teacher places pre lined butcher paper on the whiteboard and models the lesson:
    1. Writes a letter from Duncan to one or more of the crayons
    2. Places the letter in the envelope, stamp, sender’s details and postal address at the front of the envelope.
  6. The teacher then places the letter into the red postal box that the students created in their Art class.
  7. Empties the red mail box into a post man bag, opens the envelop, reads the letter and them begins to write a reply to their letter – the crayon / crayons replies to Duncan
  8. The teacher places the envelopes – Showing back and front contents and structure on the whiteboard so students can view them and refer to them.
  9. The teacher leaves one of the letters on the whiteboard as an example that the students can refer to.
  10. The teacher summarizes the structure of the personal letter – verbally and in written format and refers to the metaphoric example – hamburger – explaining facts such as – spacing – lines between certain sections of the letter, use of language, wording, sentence formation, contents, grammar,

Body of the lesson:

The students are sitting at their desks ready to complete their letter writing activities on A4 lined paper.

  1. All the students will create a brainstorming and mind mapping document prior to writing their letters.
  2. The students will write two letters
    1. A letter from Duncan to the Crayons
    2. A letter from the crayon/s to Duncan
  3. Once the students have completed their brainstorming and mind mapping documents relating to the first letter the teacher will have a short conference with the students to ensure they have completed the letter writing task correctly and explain their letter structure; contents, reasons, demonstrate their level of understanding (storybook themes, characters).
  4. Once the mini conference has been completed the students can then begin writing their first letter.
  5. Once the students have completed writing their first letter, they place them into an envelope, address them correctly – front and back and place a stamp on the envelop.
  6. The students have created a large card board mail box from a prior Art lesson which the teacher has decided to use for this lesson.
  7. The teacher has placed a postman hat on, empties the mail into a post man’s sack, jumbles the sack around to mix the letters, walks around the room, hands out envelopes – letters one by one randomly to each student sitting at their allocated tables / desks.
  8. The students will not be receiving their own completed letter as the teacher will check the sender’s details prior to handing them to the student – focuses on inclusive learning.
  9. The students will then read their received letter and take the role of a crayon or crayons stated in the letter, from Duncan and reply to Duncan.

The students must focus on:

  • the correct letter writing format
  • Sentence structure and formation.
  • Correct use if grammar; spelling, punctuation, spacing
  • Replying to the content if the letter: reasons, examples, strategies

 

Once completed the teacher will check the students completed work – ask at least 2 open ended or inquiry level questions to test the students letter writing knowledge -prior, new and current and choose five students to complete their shared activity to the class with maximum two students asking questions to each if the five students completing their shared activity.

Early finishers:

  • Can discuss their letters with the person sitting next to them on their table or choose to sit in the literacy – English learning area on comfortable large matts and discuss their letters quietly.
  • Complete online activities about letter writing using iPads and laptops – class set.

 

Conclusion:

  1. Tidy up monitors ensure the room is tidy and no resources left around the classroom.
  2. The students perform their shared activity – five students-  while maximum of two questions from different students to be asked to each of the five students completing their shared activity.
  3. The teacher asks the students questions relating to their letter writing strategies and ideas – to summarise the lesson, identify the students level of knowledge – prior, current and new against the lessons learning objectives – the teacher writes summary points on the whiteboard – refers to the 5 w”s and 1 H, joining words – and, but, then, sentence formation letter writing strategies and format.
  4. The teacher collects the students completed letters, places them on display in the literacy – English learning area – under the headings – Letter
  5. The teacher makes any necessary changes for the next lesson.
  6. Students can have free time if no more than ten minutes remaining.
  7. The teacher continues reading a story to the whole class that is used during early finishers or no more than 12 minutes – Roald Dahl books – any books with chapters that continue and aimed to intrigue and engage students about the next page, chapter etc.
  8. The teacher rechecks the room ensuring all is tidy- 6 in their required place, next lesson notes – learning intentions and resources are re placed and ready, ensuring laptops – students and teachers iPads – students and teachers are working and websites are tested links.

Evaluation of the lesson:

The teacher assesses the lesson and students from:

  • Observation
  • Open ended and inquiry based questioning
  • Whole class open discussion
  • Students achievements against the lessons learning outcomes and lesson objectives
  • Individual student progress, outcomes, ILPs, evaluation notes and progression charts

 

Follow up lesson:

Art – The Day the Crayons Quit

 

Lesson Plan 3 – Art and The Day the Crayons Quit

Rationale/Australian Curriculum Links:

This lesson is connected to the context of Visual Art and the storybook – The Day the Crayons Quit.

  • The students will be able to use and experiment with different materials, techniques, technologies and processes to make Art work (ACAVAM107) (ACARA, 2017).
  • Students will be able to create and display artwork to communicate ideas to an audience(ACAVAM108).

 

Learning Objectives:

The students will be able to:

  • Learn how to make, understand and explain more visual detail – visual conventions – why art work is created – like shape, colour and texture.
  • Learn how their ideas / subject matter can be developed through different forms, styles, techniques, materials and technologies (demonstrate, create and understand).
  • Learn about how and why craftspeople and designers present their ideas through different visuals of representation, process and viewpoint.
  • Comparing the qualities and properties such as: materials – paint, crayons – to present something
  • Explore a range of natural and man-made material to visually express their experiences
  • Share ideas with classmates about representation choices they made in their artwork
  • Make a decision about how to display their artwork to share their ideas.
  • Considering viewpoints – meaning and interpretations. (ACARA, 2017).

 

Prior Knowledge:

  • The students will need to have completed two prior lessons relating to the storybook – The Day the Crayons Quit
  • Conducted conferences with their teacher about their ideas and understanding of the storybook – The Day the Crayons Quit
  • Created open discussions about various topics connecting to the storybook – The Day the Crayons Quit

 

Learning Environment:

The students are sitting on the floor in the art room or art allocated area in their classroom facing the teacher, teacher chair, whiteboard and writing on the whiteboard in cursive writing stating – Art Fun! –The day the crayons quit. The student’s art tubs and recycling containers are placed in the centre of each table. The students are using their listening bodies while the teacher is explaining the prior and new – current lesson. The lessons learning intensions are written on A 4 lines white paper and the date is written on top of the whiteboard – on the right hand side of the whiteboard.

A teacher’s art tub is placed near the teacher’s chair and a copy of the big book – storybook – The days the crayons quit is placed in the whiteboard ledge. The hand pointer is placed near the teacher chair. The teacher uses the big book to make reference to and connection between the written letter and created objects.

The teacher has made a display board ready for the students to place their completed work – with the heading – Art is Fun! – The Day the Crayons Quit.

Resources:

  • Art tubs
  • Recycling containers
  • Art smocks
  • Art cardboard paper
  • Butcher paper
  • Pencils, textas, stencils,
  • Pre drawn images,
  • Tracing paper
  • Stencils – drawings
  • Pre drawn images
  • Glue
  • Blue tac
  • IPads and Laptops – teacher set and student set
  • Big book and student set of the storybook – The Day the crayons quit.
  • Display boards

 

Contingency plan:

  • The students who require assistance with their drawing will have objects pre drawn, use stencil outlines, tracing paper with pre drawn outlines and have the teacher assist the students with identifying their drawing objects for them and will just require to cut out the objects, colour and join them together to make a 2D or 3 D object / s.
  • To create a positive and creative settings the teacher states only whispering level noise levels will be allowed and have background music playing – such as: waterfalls, soft sounded instruments, that focus on cresting ideas, increasing motivation and a positive working environment.
  • The students can choose to either handwrite, type – Microsoft program – Word or use both options to be created and displayed.

 

Lesson Plan Sequence:

Introduction and Motivation:

  1. The teacher revisits the prior lesson briefly – focusing in a summary of the story book – The Day the Crayons Quit and structure if their letter writing activity and reference to the hamburger metaphor.
  2. The teacher then models the lesson by placing one of their written letters on the whiteboard – the letter to the crayon.
  3. The teacher asks the students to identify – choose what parts of the letters are ideas and can be created into art objects. The teacher then writes a list of the students answers and adds some of their own ideas onto the list.
  4. The teacher chooses two objects in 2D or 3D shape and creates them using the range of items in the art tub.

Body of the lesson:

  1. The students complete their art lesson in the art room or allocated art area in the classroom. The students are sitting at their tables wearing art smock and each students’ art resources are placed in a large white lower and wide plastic tub – paint, paint brushes, plastic small water rinse bottles for the art brushes, paint mixing pallets (small), crayons, pencils, textas, scissors – plastic,
  2. When students are using paint can crayon to fill in the different colours for each crayon they are encouraged to think about which colours combined make a specific crayon colour – yellow and red make orange – instead of just using the orange colour create the orange crayon.
  3. The students will create visual objects that represent their reply to the crayons and the crayons or crayon to Duncan. For example: Create a larger crayon box for all the crayons, have several multi-coloured larger crayons so that the individual coloured crayons are not always used too much.
  4. The students need to create a range of 2 D and 3 D art items.
  5. The created Art items will be placed on display with the students two letters – The audience reading the letters will be able to refer to the visual created art objects and create the contents of the letter / s.

Early finishers:

Can create a pop-up book of images – sequence order of the main themes in the story book the day the crayons quit which will be created from the remaining art resources in the plastic art tub and also recycling container contents placed on each table. If the students need another item from another student’s container box, they need to negotiate a swap scenario and all parties involved in the swap scenario need to agree on the exchange – items cannot just be taken from any of the other student’s art tubs or recycling boxes.

The students also work together to create several pages of the big book – The day the crayons quit – ‘to be placed on display with the students completed work – students are divided into groups of 5 or 4, the teacher gives each group a filled container full of resources and they need to create their assigned page- front cover, middle pages and last page. The students can use their students set or the big book on the whiteboard ledge as a reference and guide.

Conclusion and Evaluation:

  1. The teacher chooses four students to complete a shared activity at the front of the class – with maximum one or two questions being asked to each student.
  2. The teacher uses constant praise words to all students – encouragement, motivation, inclusive learning environment.
  3. The teacher asks the students to complete a reflective activity -think about what they learnt most during this lesson and the teacher will ask them to state it out verbally. The teacher places a butcher paper on the whiteboard and writes the heading What we learnt….in these three lessons – prior, current and new…and writes down the student’s key words and students names / & visual image with a text bubble and then adds them to the display board. Students will draw themselves to add to the text bubble.
  4. The teacher collects students work – places it up on the display board.
  5. Teacher discusses and summarizes all three lessons – testing students prior, current and new knowledge.
  6. The teacher allows free time if less than ten minutes left or if more continues to read out aloud the story book with chapters in it from where they left off prior.
  7. Students create a huge wall collage of visuals and texts that represent their understanding and meaning of the story book – The Day the Crayons Quit – which will be displayed in the English / Literacy learning area with the date of creation and title of the book and Author.

Assessment Ideas:

  • Completed work samples
  • Questioning – open ended, inquiry-based
  • Anecdotal notes
  • Progression charts

 

 

ICT activities relating to the above lessons – included in the general lesson, early finishers, extended lessons:

 

 

 

 

 

If you like this lesson plan, or have an idea to improve it, please consider sharing it on Twitter, Pinterest and Facebook or leave a comment below.

 

Feature image source:  http://www.oliverjeffers.com/media/tdtcq-display-rev.jpg

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